Skip to main content
Home »

Author: devorah

UV Rays – Protect Yourself

sunglasses-parker-coUltraviolet is a wavelength shorter than visible light. Sunlight produces UV rays. If we get overexposed to UV radiation, we can tan, freckle and sunburn. We also have a higher risk of skin cancer with too much exposure. There are some beneficial effects from UV. It helps in the formation of bone-strengthening vitamin D.

The Human Eye

The lens of the human eye blocks most of the ultraviolet radiation. The photoreceptors of the retina are sensitive to the UV rays. Children are more susceptible to retinal damage because the lens of the eye is clearer than an adult lens. Therefore, more UV light will transfer deeper into the eye. When we have extended times of exposure to UV light, humans can develop cataracts, macular degeneration, pterygiums and pingueculae.

Sunglasses that block 100% of the UV A (aging rays) and UV B (burning rays) are the best way to protect the tissue of the eyes. Glare off of snow, sand and water can also be hazardous to the human eye. Polarized lenses are the best option to reduce glare while driving or playing outside. Photochromic or Transition lenses are a great option in everyday glasses to help reduce the effect of UV light on the eyes.

For more information, set up an eye exam at Vaske Vision Care. Our optometrist can advise you about UV protection and other important eye health information.

The Importance of Contact Lens Fittings

man removing contact2Many times in life, One-size-fits-all can be really great! It takes the stress out of finding the right fit and is often quick, easy and convenient. But when it comes to your contact lenses, one-size-fits-all is not only an uncomfortable, but also a potentially damaging, concept that can result in serious vision and eye issues. Contact lenses generally sit directly on the cornea, making it very important that the measurements of your contact lenses are 100% accurate to ensure a comfortable, healthy fit. This will prevent eye infections and other eye conditions such as corneal abrasion, a painful scratch on the surface of the eye that can make even blinking uncomfortable!

Switching from glasses to contacts or changing your contact lens prescription are processes best overseen by your Parker, CO eye care professional. Dr. Vaske will measure your eyes properly and find the best fit for you. Below, Dr. Vaske walks us through some of the most important parts and points of proper contact lens measurements and fitting.

Taking Measurements

Each person’s eyes are just a little bit different. Some corneas are steep, while others are shallow. Some people have mild astigmatism, while others’ astigmatism is more severe, and yet others don’t have at all. All these considerations and more make proper corneal measurements a very important starting point. Your eye’s curvature will first be measured using a measuring device known as a keratometer. This is a very simple procedure, in which you simply rest your chin on a support while the instrument takes photographs of your eye. These photographs are used to analyze reflections of light from your cornea to help the doctor determine the exact curvature of your eye and the size of contact lens that you will need.

In a case in which a patient has a hard-to-fit cornea, based on an unusual curvature of the eye, further computerized measurements are often taken using corneal topography, allowing a more precise picture of the shape of the corneal surface.

With astigmatism, the surface of the eye is irregular and causes poor focusing. In this case toric contact lenses, which are made specifically to correct the distortions of the eye caused by astigmatism and requires more detailed measurements than a standard lens.

It is also important to get an accurate measurement of the pupil, the opening at the front of the eye where light enters, as well as the colored part of the eye, the iris. This is measured either with a ruler or with an automated device.

Your eye doctor at the Parker Walmart may also perform a tear film evaluation in order to assess if you are prone to dry eyes. If you are, your eye doctor may be able to prescribe you specialty lenses that help keep the eye properly hydrated and prevent dry eye symptoms such as red, itchy, uncomfortable eyes.

The Fitting

After completion of all the required measurements, your eye doctor will know what type and shape of contact lens you require. Many doctors give their patients a trial pair of lenses to try on at this point. An instrument called a biomicroscope may be used for a magnified view of the cornea with the contacts in, to assess the fit. This same instrument can also be used to detect and assess any change in the health of your eyes after beginning contact lens wear. You are likely to also have a number of follow-up visits after the initial fitting. These visits are meant to ensure that your eyes are remaining healthy with contact lens use. Our doctor should be able to order your permanent prescription after the second or third visit, assuming that he has not seen any damage to your eyes from the trial pair and has confirmed that the fit is proper.

It is important that your lenses be properly fitted to your eyes for maximum comfort and health at all times. For more information, contact Vaske Vision Care, today.

Dry Eyes Vs. Red Eyes

Dry Eyes vs. Red Eyes: How To Know and What To Do About It

dry eye syndromeRed eye and dry eye syndrome are quite easily confused. Both conditions include itchy, red and dry-feeling eyes. A person who has dry eye syndrome will often think that their red, dry, itchy eyes are nothing more than something minor, like allergies, and live a long time with the severe comfort that comes with dry eye syndrome. He/she will find that, regardless of what measures are taken, the condition does not change significantly and an eye doctor must be consulted to bring relief. Fortunately, Dr. Michael Vaske (Dr. Mike) is very familiar with the the symptoms of dry eye syndrome and how to treat it.

Dr. Mike has compiled some points of essential knowledge below, to help his patients recognize the indications of this uncomfortable and painful eye condition in a more timely fashion, so that they can prevent prolonging the pain and discomfort of this extremely uncomfortable.

What is Dry Eye Syndrome?

Dry eye syndrome is characterized by itchy, red, dry feeling eyes that do not get better unless professional medical help is obtained. Optometrists generally discuss two broad causes for dry eye syndrome. Either:

  • The eyes don’t make enough tears, and the eye cannot be comfortably hydrated

OR

  • The eye produces tears which are flawed. They often lack one or more essential parts normally included in tears to allow them to properly coat and hydrate the eye.

The leading defense against either of these forms of dry eye syndrome is a type of specialty eye drops called “artificial tears.” These special eye drops combat the uncomfortable symptoms of dry eye syndrome by imitating real tears as closely as possible. In order to do this in the best way possible, there are many different formulations of artificial tears available in Parker, CO. Each formulation addresses a different underlying cause of your dry eye. Some help to to address the issues of dry eye syndrome in which tears are lacking in quantity, and others will add one or more building blocks to your tears to help them better perform their intended function.

What Are Red Eyes?

Red eyes are generally not as worrisome as dry eye syndrome and you shouldn’t worry too much about them. In most cases, red eyes are caused by allergens or foreign substances, which can cause your eyes to become irritated. Small blood vessels throughout your eyes then become inflamed and enlarged, becoming much more visible and turning your eyes a reddish hue. This is where the term “red eyes” comes from.

Many times, red eyes will heal up and return to normal without any medical attention at all. A not of caution, however: The great number of conditions that can cause dry eyes makes it very hard to know exactly what the cause may be sometimes. If your red eyes are accompanied by a high fever, headache and/or a great deal of eye pain, go to the eye doctor immediately. This note aside, red eyes are almost always minor and should not cause anxiety unless accompanied by these additional symptoms.

Even with a brief but comprehensive explanation such as this, it can sometimes be hard to tell the difference between these two similar looking conditions. If you feel your red eyes may be something more, come see Dr. Vaske today, at the Parker Walmart Vision Center.